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txchnologist:

3-D Interactive Display Uses Fog As Screens

Engineers have built an interactive display using a tabletop system and mounted personal screens made of fog. Projectors light the fog for each user and a camera system monitors movements, allowing each person at the table to manipulate and share three-dimensional data.

A team at the University of Bristol in the UK say their device, called MisTable, is see-through and reach-through. Both fog screens and the table display can be manipulated by users.

"The personal screen provides direct line of sight and access to the different interaction spaces," said Sriram Subramanian, a professor of human-computer interaction. "Users can be aware of each other’s actions and can easily switch between interacting with the personal screen to the tabletop surface or the interaction section. This allows users to break in or out of shared tasks and switch between individual and group work."

Compare this to the Displair, by Russian inventor Maxim Kamanin. See the MisTable video below.

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Posted 2 days ago with 1,007 notes

poc who follow me, is there some magical fucking secret to finding pantyhose in the right color

Posted 3 days ago with 3 notes

I just saw goldieblox in the window of the wellesley toy store and I’m so happy :)

Posted 3 days ago with 5 notes
strugglingtobeheard:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

her name is Katherine G. Johnson


"an african-american woman" without mentioning her name. katherine johnson katherine johnson katherine johnson, remember it

strugglingtobeheard:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

her name is Katherine G. Johnson

"an african-american woman" without mentioning her name. katherine johnson katherine johnson katherine johnson, remember it

jambandit:

The Bastard Prince~

  • earl grey moonlight, caramel, almond, rose petals

The Witch of the Wilds~

  • forest berries, masala chai, decaf spice, rose hips

The Orlesian Bard~

  • lemon grass, citrus mate, cream, lemon balm

The Antivan Assassin~

  • lapsang souchong, ceylon sonata, orange, chocolate chips

shhhh okay I did it but I made a mistake I want to buy them all 8’I

Posted 3 days ago with 519 notes

madblackgirl:

"guess since im a white man im not allowed to have opinions"

your opinions have shaped the world we live in today not being catered to for 83.9 seconds will not fuckin kill you

(Source: merryblackgirl)

Posted 3 days ago with 34,470 notes

katsplanet:

whenever people say they dont like cats because they dont happily greet you at the door i give them the stinkiest eye

(Source: stevenstelfox)

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

fozmeadows:

nothingman:

via http://www.listen-tome.com/save-me/

IT’S 2AM AND I’M LAUGHING WAY TOO LOUD HELP

Posted 4 days ago with 22,675 notes

lexcanroar:

WHY ARE YOU CRYING????

hermionejg:

elloellenoh:

awesome-everyday:

KERRY I <3 YOU GIRL

"If I succeed I create the opportunity for more people to succeed…" — This

bloody love Kerry Washington

(Source: kerrybearw)

laurakvstheworld:

surechigai:

A flexible rapier made during the 19th century in Toledo, Spain.

i want this as a tiara

twisteddoodles:

'If at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

twisteddoodles:

'If at first you don't succeed…' The science version!

Posted 5 days ago with 16,217 notes

zerostatereflex:

Microorganisms: “Microscopic Life: The World of the Invisible” 1958 Encyclopaedia Britannica Films

All this beautiful life we never see,

Posted 5 days ago with 3,930 notes
currentsinbiology:

A lengthy but informative article…
What the Tamiflu saga tells us about drug trials and big pharma (The Guardian)
Today we found out that Tamiflu doesn’t work so well after all. Roche, the drug company behind it, withheld vital information on its clinical trials for half a decade, but the Cochrane Collaboration, a global not-for-profit organisation of 14,000 academics, finally obtained all the information. Putting the evidence together, it has found that Tamiflu has little or no impact on complications of flu infection, such as pneumonia.
That is a scandal because the UK government spent £0.5bn stockpiling this drug in the hope that it would help prevent serious side-effects from flu infection. But the bigger scandal is that Roche broke no law by withholding vital information on how well its drug works. In fact, the methods and results of clinical trials on the drugs we use today are still routinely and legally being withheld from doctors, researchers and patients. It is simple bad luck for Roche that Tamiflu became, arbitrarily, the poster child for the missing-data story…
…. So does Tamiflu work? From the Cochrane analysis – fully public – Tamiflu does not reduce the number of hospitalisations. There wasn’t enough data to see if it reduces the number of deaths. It does reduce the number of self-reported, unverified cases of pneumonia, but when you look at the five trials with a detailed diagnostic form for pneumonia, there is no significant benefit. It might help prevent flu symptoms, but not asymptomatic spread, and the evidence here is mixed. It will take a few hours off the duration of your flu symptoms. But all this comes at a significant cost of side-effects. Since percentages are hard to visualise, we can make those numbers more tangible by taking the figures from the Cochrane review, and applying them. For example, if a million people take Tamiflu in a pandemic, 45,000 will experience vomiting, 31,000 will experience headache and 11,000 will have psychiatric side-effects. Remember, though, that those figures all assume we are only giving Tamiflu to a million people: if things kick off, we have stockpiled enough for 80% of the population. That’s quite a lot of vomit.
Star anise provides the principal component of Tamiflu. Photograph: Adrian Bradshaw/EPA

currentsinbiology:

A lengthy but informative article…

What the Tamiflu saga tells us about drug trials and big pharma (The Guardian)

Today we found out that Tamiflu doesn’t work so well after all. Roche, the drug company behind it, withheld vital information on its clinical trials for half a decade, but the Cochrane Collaboration, a global not-for-profit organisation of 14,000 academics, finally obtained all the information. Putting the evidence together, it has found that Tamiflu has little or no impact on complications of flu infection, such as pneumonia.

That is a scandal because the UK government spent £0.5bn stockpiling this drug in the hope that it would help prevent serious side-effects from flu infection. But the bigger scandal is that Roche broke no law by withholding vital information on how well its drug works. In fact, the methods and results of clinical trials on the drugs we use today are still routinely and legally being withheld from doctors, researchers and patients. It is simple bad luck for Roche that Tamiflu became, arbitrarily, the poster child for the missing-data story…

…. So does Tamiflu work? From the Cochrane analysis – fully public – Tamiflu does not reduce the number of hospitalisations. There wasn’t enough data to see if it reduces the number of deaths. It does reduce the number of self-reported, unverified cases of pneumonia, but when you look at the five trials with a detailed diagnostic form for pneumonia, there is no significant benefit. It might help prevent flu symptoms, but not asymptomatic spread, and the evidence here is mixed. It will take a few hours off the duration of your flu symptoms. But all this comes at a significant cost of side-effects. Since percentages are hard to visualise, we can make those numbers more tangible by taking the figures from the Cochrane review, and applying them. For example, if a million people take Tamiflu in a pandemic, 45,000 will experience vomiting, 31,000 will experience headache and 11,000 will have psychiatric side-effects. Remember, though, that those figures all assume we are only giving Tamiflu to a million people: if things kick off, we have stockpiled enough for 80% of the population. That’s quite a lot of vomit.

Star anise provides the principal component of Tamiflu. Photograph: Adrian Bradshaw/EPA

There is no system of oppression in America that actively works to oppress and subjugate white people. Sorry to break it to you, but your individual suffering is just that, individual. The individuals acting against you do not have the institutionalized power to actively oppress you in every facet of your life, nor would their racism be upheld and supported by government, media, and legislation if they did. Because you’re white.

Reverse racism isn’t real because we live in a culture that supports and enforces whiteness as the norm and PoC as other. If you experience discrimination, prejudice, or bigotry, it’s valid to be upset about it and want to talk about it. It is not valid to claim that it is reverse racism, and certainly not valid to claim that it is racism on par with anything like the institutionalized racism that PoC will come into contact with.

Why Reverse Racism Isn’t Real by Sara Luckey (via hachikuji)

(Source: bestoffates)

Posted 6 days ago with 6,175 notes